Is Homeschooling Expensive?

Homeschooling cost can vary greatly depending on your needs, educational interest, age, the number of children, and the availability of community resources.

In general, you can say that educating your child at home is more expensive than public education, but much less than private.  If you are able to educate your child at home the statistics show that it is well worth it.

Economical Approach: $100-$400 per year per child

Items included in yearly cost:

  • Deeply discounted, used, borrowing or renting books. Same study materials for multiple children.  The curriculum can be the most expensive part of home education.
  • Utilizing free online resources, heavy library usage and support group resources.
  • Discounted group field trips, free community events, and support group events.
  • Socialization – Church, field trips, support group, and neighborhood friends and family.

Moderate Approach: $400-$700 per year per child

Items included in yearly cost:

  • Curriculum from different companies at discounted prices and possibly some used books. Sharing of some study materials.
  • Educational online games, software, basic school supplies, and books to add to the home library. Desk, computers, bookcases, chairs, file cabinet, dry erase board or science equipment is not included.
  • Yearly testing, professional association fees and yearly conference on home education.
  • Co-Op classes.
  • Socialization – Museums, educational events, field trips, and fun social activities. Church and support group activities are still utilized.

Most Costly Approach: $700- $1700 per year per child

Items included in yearly cost:

  • Inclusive curriculum packages, independent study or satellite school. Typically new books along with software, online support, and videos but the homeschool foundation might help.
  • Educational online games, software, school supplies including science materials and books to add to the home library. Some school room furniture included.
  • Co-Op classes, band, and music.
  • Socialization – Museums, educational events, field trips, and fun social activities. Church and support group activities are still utilized.

Other Financial Considerations For all Approaches:

  • Ages of children, can materials be used by multiple children or reused the following year. As a child gets older the educational cost tends to increase. This is also true for the public education system. For homeschool grants, check out this article.
  • Potential recouping of material cost by selling books, guides, and videos, once finished using them. Resell income ranges from 50% to 65% of your purchase cost. Of course, the better the condition and the more in demand the subject, the higher resell value.
  • Items needed to create an organized learning area. Some home educators have specific areas or a room dedicated to home education and others do not. This is one of those items very specific to the families’ abilities, needs and wants. There is no evidence that one group receives better education over the other.
  • The amount that you would spend on public education. Supplies, PE and school uniforms, teachers’ gifts, fundraisers, field trips, athletic teams and traveling cost, school lunch etc…
  • What extracurricular activities you would have your children in even if they attended public school or attend, for example, GED classes.
  • High school-aged children may take college courses.
  • A potential loss of income for the parent who stays home.
  • Fewer doctor visits – less exposure to viruses and flu strains.

So…..is homeschooling expensive? Hopefully, we gave you some clarity on the subject. As you can clearly see, one’s income does not have to dictate whether a family can homeschool their child successfully. With some creativity, it can be accomplished on almost any budget. The cost is really up to you.

If you have no idea where to start if you think about homeschooling your child, go to this post with lots of information.